Di-human-ide (definitions)
American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims' 2007 definitions of a dihumanide molecule, as a structure comprised of two human molecules. [1]
In human chemistry, dihumanide molecule is the scientific name of the formation of two human molecules attached, via a human chemical bond, in union, e.g. AB, A-B, A=B, A≡B, etc., considered as a unit more so than two separate entities. [1] The suffix “-ide” signifies a molecular compound or structure usually derived from or related to another, usually specified, compound or structure. [2] The prefix “di-“ is the Greek term used to signify two.


Overview
In 1987, Indian-born Pakistani organometallic chemist Mirza Beg, in his New Dimensions in Sociology: a Physico-Chemical Approach to Human Behavior, referred to bonded associations of individual people: A, B, C, etc., which he refers to as chemical species or molecules, as he alludes, of form AB, BC, AC, AA, etc., as “dimers”, such as the formation of "close friends denoted by AB formed according to reaction":

 A + B \rightleftharpoons  AB \,

and groupings or associations such as ABC as “trimmers”. [3] In this sense, in Beg terminology, a bonded couple would be referred to as "human dimer" and a bonded union of three human molecules (or human chemicals) would be referred to as a "human trimer".

In circa 2000, American child prodigy turned astrophysicist Christopher Hirata, in his “The Physics of Relationships”, was uses the symbols of X = girl, Y = boy, and XY = paired relationship, calling the single boys and girls, i.e. men and women on his college campus, as “basic elements”, defining the pair bonding reaction as follows: [4]

X + Y ↔ XY

Hirata also comments, in reference to the subject of queer chemistry (and other poly-amorphous relationships), in his human chemical reaction modeling that he is neglecting “rare and non-traditional” products or compounds (human molecules) that may form such as “the gay molecule Y2, the lesbian molecule X2, and the middle-Eastern polygamous molecule X4Y.”

In 2007, American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims, in his Human Chemistry, building in some historical sense on the earlier work of David Hwang, was employing the following notation for male human molecule, female human molecule, and a baby or child human molecule: [5]

Human molecule (symbols)

Human molecule (symbols) 2

The "human molecular symbols" articles goes into more detail.

See also
‚óŹ Polyhumanide molecule

References
1. (a) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One) (dihumanide molecule, pgs. 34, 119, 170, 282). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
(b) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two) (pg. 68). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
2. Suffix: -ide (definitions) - Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 2000.
3. Beg, Mirza Arshad Ali. (1987). New Dimensions in Sociology: a Physico-Chemical Approach to Human Behavior (abs) (intro) (pgs. 75, 90, etc.). Karachi: The Hamdard Foundation.
4. (a) Hirata, Christopher M. (c.2000). “The Physics of Relationships” (section: Fun), Tapir.Caltech.edu; (WayBack Machine).
(b) Hirata, Christopher M. (2010). "The Physics of Relationships", Journal of Human Thermodynamics, 6(5): 62-76.
5. (a) Hwang, David. (2001). “The Thermodynamics of Love” (WB) (pdf), Journal of Hybrid Vigor, Issue 1, Emory University.
(b) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One) (dihumanide molecule, pgs. 34, 119, 170, 282). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
(c) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two) (pg. 68). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.

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