Human molecular spin
Generalized model of human molecular spin or the spin of a human molecule (person): (a) top left: a blindfolded swimmer going in circles, (b) bottom left: a blindfolded driver going in circles, (c) right: a person moving their average daily activity orbitals, school S, work W, friend's houses F1 and F2, grocery store G, mall M, each connected to the nucleus of the home H, within each of which movement tends to be circular, contained by visual wave guides, e.g. walls, roads, sidewalks, etc., operating clockwise or counter-clockwise, depending on whether one is north or south of the equator, respectively, a process dictated by field particle exchange or a combination of the electromagnetic force and the gravitational force. [1]
In human chemistry, human molecular spin is the intrinsic angular momentum of a human molecule, i.e. a person, which continues to exist even when the molecule comes to rest. [1] The generalized noticeable effect of the spin of humans is the daily rotation patterns that occur in one’s human molecular orbitals. In simple terms, if a person is blindfolded and put on a vast flat surface, such as a salt flat, and told to move continuously in a straight line, either by walking forward or driving forward, while blinded, it is found that the resulting path will be curled and not straight.

In short, for human molecules moving about on the surface of the earth, in their respective daily orbitals or activity spheres, north of the equator, the earth’s magnetic field lines go into the ground, thus according to the right hand rule, movement will tend to be directed or "curled" in a clockwise direction (hence people tend to drive on the right hand side of the road); for human molecules moving about on the surface of the earth, in their respective daily orbitals or activity spheres, south of the equator, the earth’s magnetic field lines come out of the ground, thus according to the right and rule, movement will tend to be directed in a counter-clockwise direction (hence people tend to drive on the left hand side of the road).

Thus, if movement patterns are tracked, say at the workplace, over the course of a day, it is found that people tend to ‘feel’ comfortable moving clockwise, if they work north of the equator, and counter-clockwise, if they work south of the equator.

History
The phenomenon of human curling motion was first documented by Austrian physicist Ernst Mach with his circa 1885 drawings of the “turning tendencies” of troop movements when lost in a snow storm at night without visual direction.

The theory that people or human molecules in their daily movement have a type of spin originating from field particle exchange between humans and their environment, humans and the earth, which is in some way coupled to the spin of the sun, which is in turn coupled to the spin of the milky way, which is in some way connected to the trajectory of the local group towards the great attractor, was first outlined in manuscript form in circa 2004 by American chemical-electrical engineer Libb Thims and published as three-page subsection in 2007. [1]

A similar theory of cosmically coupled spins is found in the circa 2003 work of Swiss-born American theoretical physicist Nassim Haramein and his torus universe model. [2]

Human chemical bonding
In chemical bondings between people, in human molecular orbital theory, it is hypothesized that stabilizing bonds result when paired spins are congruent in some way, and extended version of the Pauli exclusion principle for two human molecules in the formation of a paired dihumanide molecule.

References
1. (a) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One) (human molecular spin, pg. 196, section: Human molecular spin, 209-11). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
(b) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two) (section: Human molecular spin, pgs. 209-11). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
2. (a) Haramein, Nassim and Rauscher, Elizabeth A. (2003). “A Consideration of Torsion and Coriolis Effects in Einstein’s Field Equations”, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. S10016, Four Corners, AZ, Oct. 24.
(b) Haramein, Nassim and Rauscher, Elizabeth A. (2004). “The Origin of Spin: A Consideration of Torque and Coriolis Forces in Einstein’s Field Equation” (abstract), Journal; in: R. L. Amoroso, B. Lehnert & J-P Vigier (eds.), Beyond The Standard Model: Searching For Unity In Physics (Proceedings of the Paris Symposium Honoring the 83rd Birthdayof Jean-Pierre Vigier) (pgs. 153-168). The Noetic Press, 2005.

External links
‚óŹ Spin (physics) – Wikipedia.

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