In hmolscience, social field is region in which a social body experiences a force as the result of the presence of some other body or bodies.

Overview
In 1994, Dirk Helbing, as cited by Yi-Fang Chang (2013), developed a mathematical model, supposedly, for behavioral changes under the influence of a social field. [1]

In 2012, Ram Poudel began working on a social field theory, conceptually-based on a Navier-Stokes equation (Ѻ), i.e. a “social fluid” model themed logic.

In Mar 2019, Poudel, and co-author Jon McGowan (Ѻ), submitted “The Dynamics of Human Society Evolution: an Energetics Approach” to the Hindawi-based journal Complexity (Ѻ), the abstract of which is the following: [2]

“Human society is an open system that evolves by coupling with various known and unknown (energy) fluxes. How do these dynamics precisely unfold? Energetics may provide further insights. We expand on Navier Stokes’ approach to study non-equilibrium dynamics in a field that evolves with time. Based on the ‘social field theory’, an induction of the classical field theories, we define social force and social energy and Hamiltonian of an individual in a society. The equations for the evolution of an individual and society are sketched based on the time-dependent Hamiltonian that includes power dynamics. In this paper, we will demonstrate that Lotka-Volterra type equations can be derived from the Hamiltonian equation in the social field.”

The article is dedicated to Richard Adams and his The Eighth Day.

References
1. (a) Helbing, Dirk. (1994). “Article”, Journal of Mathematical Sociology, 19(3):189.
(b) Chang, Yi-Fang. (2013). “Social Thermodynamics, Social Hydrodynamics, and Some Mathematical Applications in Social Sciences” (pdf), International Journal of Modern Social Sciences, 2(2):94-108.
2. Poudel, Ram and McGowan, Jon. (2019). “The Dynamics of Human Society Evolution: an Energetics Approach”, 37-page article submitted to Complexity (reviews: Arto Annila, James Dixon (Ѻ), and anon), Mar 10.

Further reading
● Poudel, Ram. (2014). “Social Field Theory” (Ѻ), Blog, E4cdp.org, Nov 15.

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