sociophysics and sociochemistry
American philosopher Alexander Rosenberg's 1980 definition of sociophysics and or sociochemistry—or "socio-physical chemistry" in modern (2014) truncated Hmolpedia neologism terms—as the systematic study of the physical and chemical basis of social behavior. [1]
In science, socio-physical chemistry, or sociophysics + sociochemistry, is the systematic study of the physical and chemical basis of social behavior. [1]

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“It is very unlikely that the general characteristics of Gibbs’ system had anything to do with Pareto’s construction of his social system. In other words it is very probable, I think nearly certain, that Pareto did not keep Gibbs’ work in mind and a fortiori that he did not imitate it, when he worked out his social system; so that Pareto’s system is not the result of the application of the theories of physical chemistry to sociology.”
Lawrence Henderson (1935), Pareto’s General Sociology: a Physiologists Interpretation [2]

See also
‚óŹ Two cultures department | Naming issues

References
1. Rosenberg, Alexander. (1980). Sociobiology and the Preemption of Social Science (pg. 154). Johns Hopkins University Press.
2. Henderson, Lawrence J. (1935). Pareto’s General Sociology: a Physiologists Interpretation (keyword: thermodynamics, pgs. 10, 47, 82, 90, 92; note 5: “The Sources of Pareto’s Social System”, pgs. 91-93). Harvard University Press.

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